FEATURE

BINDING LAB

 

Lab Members

Dr. Jane Elsley

Position

Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Contact

Jelsley@bournemouth.ac.uk

Research Interests

Working Memory

Feature Binding

Visual Memory


Postgraduate Students

Simon Ferneyhough

Position

PhD Student

Research

Simon’s PhD investigates the impact of normal cognitive ageing on feature binding ability.



Research Apprentices

As part of Bournemouth University’s Research Apprenticeship scheme (developed to promote Fusion between staff and students, in line with BUs visions and values), undergraduate students across their second and third year of study have the opportunity to join staff research laboratories as ‘hands on’ Research Apprentices.


Feature Binding and the Role of Attentional Resources

This project aims to resolve one point of current disagreement in the literature, namely, whether feature binding in visual working memory requires more attention than the processing of individual features, and whether the requirement for attentional resources is dependent on the stimuli to-be-bound.  The experiment the RAs are running contrasts the contribution of attentional resources between two types of feature binding: That between surface-features (colour and shape); and that between object identity features (colour/shape) and spatial location.


    Research Team

    Jasmine Blane (3rd year undergraduate)

    Robyn Credgington-jones (3rd year undergraduate)

    Shobonna Akhter (2nd year undergraduate)

    Omololo Olukotun (2nd year undergraduate)

    Marcus Backmark (2nd year undergraduate)



The Time-Course and Temporal Dynamics of Verbal-Spatial Bindings in Working Memory

This project examines the fate of feature bindings (between letter and location stimuli in the first instance) over time, through employing a task that assesses verbal-spatial binding, and manipulating the retention interval - the time elapsed between memory display and test. Previous research from the visual domain suggests that binding may be flexible and temporally dynamic, such that associations between features change over time. This project aims to ascertain whether the same is true for verbal-spatial bindings, which form an integral aspect of routine cognitive operations like reading.


    Research Team

    Ellen Butcher (Project Lead: 3rd year undergraduate)

    Ellie Martin (3rd year undergraduate)

    Ryan Webb (2nd year undergraduate)

    Graeme Carson (2nd year undergraduate)




Andrew Moss (as second supervisor)

Position

PhD Student

Research

Andrew’s PhD investigates serial memory for olfactory stimuli.



Research Apprentices (2013-14)



Eight undergraduate students worked in the lab during the academic year 2013-2014 on a voluntary basis. In addition, one student was awarded a prestigious paid research placement to work with us over the summer. The research students worked on three projects examining feature binding in working memory, outlined below.

The retrieval of features from bound representations as a function of their spatial proximity.

This project examined how features from visual objects (e.g., coloured shapes) are retrieved from memory. The project focused on two main questions - are multiple objects held in working memory in a spatial configuration; and if so, does the metric spatial distance between objects influence their retrieval (i.e., is retrieval facilitated when to-be-retrieved features are spatially proximal rather than distant)? The project is an extension of our earlier ESRC funded grant work.


    Research Team

    Omololo Olukotun (2nd year undergraduate)

    Marcus Backmark (2nd year undergraduate)